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Cyber-addiction is rising

Cyberdependence: Is technology toxic?

Health professionals, parents, teachers, and parents would benefit from promoting a realistic, proactive and inventive discourse on new technologies to overcome the fear of fear of the anguish of modernity.

protect your kidsThe Internet and video games are now part of our daily lives, which does not prevent them from being regularly the focus of controversy. They are readily credited with having a negative influence on the new generations.

For example, in recent years, the concept of “cyberaddiction” has been used to evoke the abusive use that can be made of these technologies. Many psychologists remind us that addiction and virtual addiction is still not listed as a pathology in the international classification of mental disorders.

But the notion of addiction has expanded its perimeter and no conduct seems to be able to escape it.

Addiction to virtual addiction in adolescence would be more of a stigmatization than a true diagnosis, a judgment that runs the risk of freezing a child and his or her family in a misunderstanding of their difficulties.

Fear of A New Social Data

Almost all technical and cultural developments have generated their share of hopes, apprehensions, and worries. Writing, printing, the press, cinema, radio, television and now information and communication technologies, including the Internet and video games, are no exception to the rule.

The 35-year-olds have always been wary of the influence of technological innovations on their children’s future, education or psyche. Concerns that revolve around recurrent themes: New media could replace the “real life” and legacy of previous generations in the learning of moral principles while maintaining an excessive and unhealthy imagination.

Cyber-addiction: Definition

The term “cyberd├ępendances” has enjoyed some success since the 1990s, following on from the concepts of “drug-free addiction,” mentioned by Otto Fenichel in 1949.

Among the pitfalls to avoid, the assimilation of the Internet as a toxic substance that, in addition to demonizing a tool that is widely used today and used daily by millions of people, makes it possible to identify a comfortable scapegoat.

The perimeters of concepts are even more complex when one considers cyber dependency from adolescence: the quest for identity, psychological fragility, imposes an absolute caution regarding diagnosis.

Issues

phoning while drivingThe Internet offers opportunities and accessibility to a wide variety of content. Combined with the ability to remain anonymous behind the screen, these new uses are changing our online media and behaviors.

Beyond the dangers of dependency, there are other issues that arouse public interest. The increasingly violent content, increasingly shocking images, overdose and pornographic scriptwriting contribute to the formatting of adolescents’ emotional and sexual education.

For older people, this immoderate flow also contributes to a radical reconsideration of the notions of privacy, social ties and a series of cognitive problems specific to the “Google generation” (attention disorders, dysorthography, etc.).

In the same way, our relationship with time and space is shaken up “confusing real and virtual would be, in this case, wanting to decode our existences in the light of the exceptional, the” photogenic .” The debate on violence in video games is an example of this.

Read more on this topic here www.addictionrecov.org/internet.aspx