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Google continues its offensive against abusive advertising

Google announces new measures against abusive advertising. After the popup and videos in autoplay, it’s the unwanted redirections that are in its collimator.

Google continues to improve the experience on its Chrome browser. As he prepares to launch an integrated ad blocker, the firm is also taking steps against pop-ups, pop-unders and now abusive redirections.

In a blog post of Chromium, the company announces three new functionalities to protect Internet users. They will be deployed on the next versions of the browser.

hshdaohgoshgoshgoshgiosOne of these features is aimed at redirects that automatically return the user to another page. According to Google, these redirections do not usually come from the creator of the page, but from the third party, elements integrated by the latter.

And to avoid this type of bad experience, from version 64 onwards, all redirections coming from iframes (such as embedded videos) will be blocked. Instead, the user will see an information bar. The redirection, on the other hand, can only be done if the user has clicked on the iframe.

Also, Google is also targeting a technique sometimes used by websites (especially in porn) to bypass popup blockages.

When the user clicks on a link, the content opens in a new window while the main window opens another unwanted page (usually advertising). These redirections will also be blocked from version 65 onwards.

And finally, Google Chrome will protect its users against fake play buttons that redirect to another page, clear filters and other malicious techniques that aim to make users click to redirect them to another page. You can see a lot of them on illegal download or streaming sites.

If you think that your website might be affected by these new measures, you can use the validator proposed by Mountain View to see what changes you need to make to your pages.

The practices targeted by these future updates are part of the reasons why Internet users end up installing ad blockers. And because Google makes money from online advertising, it’s in their best interest to stop using them.